Thursday, 6 June 2013

A Bogan Reads A Book (A Billion Times)

Today I have the tedious task of bringing to you my favourite books, movies and songs. I say tedious because this list will most likely be extremely short, boring and predictable.

Once again, I will totally lose some bogan cred when I confess that I have never even read the 50 Shades Of Grey trilogy. Is it even a trilogy? No idea. I know. Shocking, right? How can I call myself a bogan?

Likewise, I've never touched any of the Twilight series or The Hunger Games either.

My love of books began predictably enough with good old smashing Enid Blyton. It was quite a shock to discover that the woman who created The Magic Faraway Tree, The Famous Five series and many other books, all of which I devoured as a child, was, in fact, rather horrid in real life and not the sweet, whimsical person one would have imagined. Sigh. I guess that is why we love escaping into fiction. Reality SUCKS.

Following my escapades up The Faraway Tree, where I seem to have permanently left my brain, I read Anne Of Green Gables and the whole 'Anne' series. A new obsession began. She made me proud to be a ranga. And proud to wear puffed sleeves. Shut up. It was the 80's.

But surely my most overwhelming book obsession came in the early 90's with the publication of an authorised biography about The Carpenters called The Carpenters: The Untold Story by Ray Coleman.  I read it a few billion times. This was riding on the coat tails of a similar obsession with a God awful made for TV movie  about Karen Carpenter, imaginatively titled The Karen Carpenter Story.

One of the most curious things about that TV movie, apart from the absurd amount of times I was able to watch it, was the fact that they had apparently gone to extraordinary lengths to ensure that certain details in the film were supposedly accurate, so they had used The Carpenters real clothes, instruments, cars and filmed certain scenes in their real home. Then, after doing all that, the actress who played Karen, Cynthia Gibb, wore the most ridiculous, fake looking wigs throughout. Weird. Yet I watched. Then I watched it again. And again. Just as I had read that Coleman bio again and again. Maybe I was hoping it would end differently if I read it just one more time. Nope. She still died in the end. Every. Single.Time. *sobs*

Bad wig alert. As well as bad acting, bad script..and a truly
bad ending. Sigh.

Then, in 2010 yet another bio about Karen came along which emphasised how much the previous Ray Coleman one, (and The Karen Carpenter Story) had been sugar coated and white washed. I realised that I had readthe previous book so many times looking for something that wasn't there. What Karen was really like. I felt like I got that from this book, so it's now my new favourite.


Which brings me to my favourite songs. You'll never guess in a million years what they are. No way. Okay, I'll tell you.

Carpenters ones. What a shock.

 I love this live performance of Rainy Days And Mondays. And weren't the 70's groovy?


Oh okay, their songs were a bit cheesy. But, THE VOICE. Except this one. Cutting edge stuff.


The song. The accompanying film clip, with all the planets and spaceships that make Star Wars look like Pigs In Space. The green satin jump suit. Classic. Shut up.

I also love Barbra Streisand songs and movies. Which is odd, because I don't really like people particularly, or think that people who need people are the luckiest people in the world. Not really. People are the WORST. I'll still listen to Le Babs sing it, though.  Nothing but the best for this bogan.

Linking up with The Lounge which is being hosted this week by Tegan from Musings Of The Misguided.



Do you have any book or movie obsessions? Or favourite songs?
Reactions:

21 comments:

  1. Totally love this post Ness - I do not care how horrid Enid Blyton was supposedly in real life, I so loved the books and introduced my Son to them.... sometimes tried and true is best - forget 50 Shades biggest load of crap out... got over the sex in the first 50 pages!!!

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    1. Sadly my boys won't read Enid. And yep, I'm sick of hearing about 50 Shades without even reading it! x

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  2. Well you are in good company Ness as I am obsessed with red heads too (a couple in particular but there's no need to retread that old ground here). I was considering having "On Top of the World" as my bridal waltz. And I love Ms Streisand. I dont know why (straight) men seem to find her so offensive. To them I say "Don't rain on my parade".

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  3. I haven't read 50 shades, twilight or hunger games either, just not really interesting. When I was younger I used to love reading The Magic Pudding. I think I read it close to 50 times.

    Thanks for linking up with us at The Lounge

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    1. I've definitely read Anne Of Green Gables more than 50 times. Ahem. xo

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  4. Love enid! But i will try to find the old school un pollitically correct versions of jer books.for my kids! I love your carpenters obsession!

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    1. I love it too! You might have noticed. LOL! xo

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  5. Hunger Games (the books) weren't bad, someone loaned them to me, Tania I think. A friend gave me the PDF for the first Shades of Grey book - what a pile of dog's vomit. Poorly written shite and barely earned the title of erotic. Loved good old Enid, Famous Five, Secret Seven, all those boarding school stories. Brilliant stuff. Did not know she was horrid in real life, but realistic (some would say cynical) me is not surprised.

    I rarely read anything on best seller lists. Favourite books are things like Lord of the Flies, 1984 and anything by Asimov or Arthur C Clarke, in fact that whole SF era. Oh, and Heinlein and Gene Wolfe and Stephen Donaldson et al. If it's marked Oprah's book club I steer well clear. As a book reviewer she makes a pretty good ex talk show host (with a few, notable, exceptions.)

    You do make me smile with your Carpenter's obsession - still, there's many worse things to be obsessed about :)

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    1. I generally don't get into Sci Fi, unless it's comical. I read the Hitchhikers Guide To The Galaxy series and that was about it. I love your comments regarding Oprah. Snorts.

      Scarily enough I know there are people out there who are EVEN MORE Carpenters obsessed than me. Yes, it's possible.

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    2. Jeez Ness I just watched that green satin, interplanetary one. There are no words.

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    3. I apologise for the 3 minutes or so of your life you'll never get back.

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  6. Oh that movie, The Carpenters, was SO sad, breaks my heart thinking about how miserable her life was. I haven't read in ages, I know what a loser, but I don't have time (okay so maybe I do but I play candy crush - even MORE of a loser right?) Em xx

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    1. The movie was nothing (really sugar coated)commpared to the Little Girl Blue bio. Sigh.

      Everybody seems to be into Candy Crush lately, so NO, not a loser, you're in good company. xo

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  7. I, too, was an Anne of Green Gables tragic. That dashing Gilbert!

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    1. I know, right? *swoons* I have a tragic crush on a fictional character. Oh dear. At least I'm not the only one! x

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  8. I think I may have mentioned this before but my family STILL make fun of me because I rad Anne of Green Gables no less than 12 times. And that was just one book! I read everything in the series - and all the spin offs. I still love Gilbert Blythe and I don't care who knows it!

    But on a side note I would like to say... you are a very entertaining writer. You should be as kind to yourself as you are to others (which is quite a lot from what I have personally observed). Love ya Ness - The Lounge would be that much more boring without our beloved bogan representative

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    1. Nawww thanks Rach, I don't know why I still struggle with accepting compliments at my age. I'll keep working on it.

      I think I may have read Anne more times than that, so 12 times is quite restrained. xo

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  9. Ness - how did I miss your linkup the first time around! You sound like a girl who appreciates FULL CHEESE. But I also hear you - her voice is divine, and story so sad.
    Sorry I'm late. Hope to read something new from you tomorrow

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    1. Sorry I missed your comment too! Oops.

      Yep, I'm certainly into cheese in a big way. x

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  10. After reading your many praises of the Carpenters, I can't believe your apology and comments about the Carpenters being cheesy. As you know, I have wide eclectic interest in music (classical on up to metal), and the Carpenters are a great act! I'm proud and happy to say that the Carpenters nourish my soul; no more of these aplogies, please dear lady.

    Now I'd like to share my favorite book with you. It's Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. For anyone reading this post that doesn't know about this classic novel of the 20th Century, I highly recommend it to anyone who wants to know what it means to be human and free.

    This dystopian novel depicts a bleak future where people are controlled from birth through reproductive technology, conditioning, chemically induced happiness, sex, amusements, etc. The inhabitants worship technology, not God. It's a caste system with World Controllers at the top and manufactured semi-moron servants at the bottom. The book was written in 1932. Does this society of the future bear any resemblance to our own?

    Huxley does such a wonderful job describing this futuristic society. One of my favorite parts of the book is when Huxley describes a Native American dance ceremony in a reservation in New Mexico as two vacationing inhabitants of the advanced society observe and react.

    Then there's the character John, "The Savage", who is the child of two advanced society people who got left behind with his mother at the reservation. He developed a love of the banned books of Shakespeare and other books of old. He saw the magic in them, but then he's brought back to the advanced society as a man.

    Huxley was a keen observer of human nature. This book is quite simply brilliant. You won't be the same after you read it. It has shaped my thinking in many ways, since I first read it in high school many years ago, and no other book has amazed and deeply enlightened me at the same time as this one has.

    :-)
    Ben




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